Domaine de Canton!

Wooooo-hooooo!

I made it to the 2nd round of the Domaine de Canton bartender of the year cocktail contest!

I hope they like my technique in creating my “La Coquette” on May 29th.

I’m looking forward to meeting some other great cocktail creators and gain some new experience!

-Cheers!

La Coquette, the $10K (hopefully) cocktail, part 2

Alrighty, so I laid out the details on how I made my lavodka as well as my lemon bitters, two crucial ingredients in my La Coquette cocktail.  Now I will write about the special sugar rim.

After some trial and error, I finalized the composition of the cocktail itself, but I wanted to work on the presentation.  I wanted to serve the drink up in a cocktail martini glass, but I wanted to make sure it looked sexy and sophisticated.  I also wanted to showcase the lavender somehow in the drink besides just in the flavor.  I made several attempts to have a frond of lavender shooting out of the glass, but I could never find a method to create a consistent presentation.

What I came up with was a way to add color to the rim by blending fresh blackberries with sugar.  I go to the Claremont farmers market every Sunday morning with Amy to pick up fresh local produce for the week.  One of the stands we love is Pudwill Berry Farms. They specialize in all sorts of seasonal berries: fresh blueberries, white and red raspberries, and my favorite, blackberries. I bought a 3-pack of blackberries to play with at the bar. I sliced each berry in half lengthwise and placed them slice-side up on a half baking sheet.

I didn’t want to spend extra money on a dehydrator, so I just let the half-sheet of berries sit out in my office at work for about a week until the berries shrunk to about half of their original size.  I then ground the berries up with sugar in a molcajete to mash the berries and turn the sugar into a beautiful purple mixture.

It definitely takes some time to grind all the berries up, but the consistency is key here.  I didn’t want a mixture that was part dark purple and part light.  It probably took me a good 15-20 minutes of solid grinding away to create a consistent mixture.

At this point, the sugar mix still has a bit of moisture, so I dried it out again on another half-sheet overnight.

Once the sugar mix was dry, I threw it back in the molcajete to grind it into a finer blend.  There were still some blackberry seeds left in the mix, so I fine-strained the sugar mix to remove them and have a smooth consistent blackberry sugar mix.

So now I’ve got my three homemade creations finished, it’s time to make my La Coquette!

What you’ll need:

2 ounces Domaine de Canton

1 ounce lavodka

1 ounce fresh lemon juice

1 sugar cube

1/8 ounce lemon bitters

2 slices fresh ginger

Blackberry sugar

1 regular lemon for garnish

1 Cocktail martini glass

1 pint glass with metal tin to create a boston shaker

1 hawthorne strainer (the one with the spring)

1 fine mesh strainer

Ice

Citrus peeler or knife

Muddler

Method:

Start off by muddling the sugar and bitters (YES!) along with the 2 slices of fresh ginger.  You want to beat the ginger into a pulp, so that when you mix it, the fresh ginger incorporates with everything else.

Next add the 1 ounce of fresh lemon juice, the 1 ounce of lavodka, and the 2 ounces of Domaine de Canton liqueur.  As I’ve stated before, using a jigger will help with precise measurements.

Now before you add ice and dilute the cocktail, let’s prep the glass with the sugar.

For the presentation of this cocktail, I didn’t want the sugar granules to float around in with the cocktail once it’s been poured in the glass.  I felt that keeping the sugar on the outside of the glass made for a cleaner, sexier looking cocktail.  Take a slice of lemon and wipe it onto the rim of the cocktail glass, make sure to apply ample juice to the outside of the glass. To make sure the blackberry sugar stays only on the outside of the glass, flip the glass over and sprinkle the sugar where you wiped the lemon.

Now that the glass is ready, its time to chill and dilute our cocktail mixture.  Add some ice to the mixing glass, slap on the metal tin to secure it, flip it into your hand and give it a healthy shake for about 8 seconds.  This will make sure the drink gets chilled properly while breaking up the ice and adding a little dilution to the solution.

Slap the tin to break the seal of the mixing glass and then give the drink a little sample.  Make sure you like what you taste, I always do.  Throw the hawthorne strainer over the top of the tin, and then strain the liquid through the fine strainer into the cocktail glass.

(The picture above shows one of the trials with the lavender flower stem poking through a lemon peel.  Like I said, I couldn’t get a consistent result, but it sure does look pretty!)

I like to add a last aromatic touch by peeling the rind of half a lemon, then twisting and squeezing the oils out over the glass.  I like to wipe the lemon rind along the underside of the glass and the stem, so the guest gets the citrus oils on their hands.  Almost everyone likes the smell of citrus, so when it gets on their hands, it creates a total experience by engaging them with the cocktail.

Place the cocktail on a napkin, give a wink and say “cheers!”

You just created my La Coquette.  I hope you find the name fitting, for she truly is a seductress!

I really like the balance and subtleties of this creation.  I enjoy the way the fresh ginger gives it a little bite in the beginning, but then the Domaine de Canton mellows it out for a nice finish.  (I failed to mention earlier that the Domaine de Canton is a blend of baby Vietnamese ginger and V.S.O.P. Cognac, I think the Cognac definitely gives it the smoothness you would expect from a well cared for French brandy.)  The lavodka adds great flavor and depth without being too overpowering.  The fresh lemon juice works well to add the acidity and brightness.  While the lemon bitters adds aromatics and complexity, the blackberry sugar adds the necessary color and sweetness to compliment the perfect sip.

Hopefully, the Domaine de Canton judges will like it enough to allow me to mix it live for them during a round of judging.  If I even make it to the second round, I will consider it a great honor.  I will definitely post any new developments and keep you updated.

Cheers!

-W