Barrel aged items v2.0

Hi there, I know, it has not been long enough between posts, but hey, I found a little free time to get some pictures uploaded and typing done!

So after I had emptied the two barrels, I decided to age some whiskey based cocktails.  I let the barrels dry out after the first experimentation, so I needed to re-prep the barrels by loading them up with water

Saturating the barrels with water

I wanted to age two of my favorite whiskey cocktails, the Old Fashioned of course, and also a Manhattan.  I just started these on Thursday, so we’ll see how they turn out in a few weeks.

Here is the whole setup with both barrels and everything I’m planning to throw together.

The countertop showing all the different ingredients.

In the smaller barrel, I decided to age the Old Fashioned.

Here is what I added to the barrel including the quantities:

750ml Buffalo Trace boubron

One whole bottle of Buffalo Trace, poured into the barrel

150ml Luxardo Maraschino liqueur

Measuring out the Luxardo Maraschino liqueur

100ml Angostura bitters

The Angostura bitters, all measured out

6 dried orange peels chopped up into bits

Dried orange peels, chopped up for easy insertion (and eventual removal)

Dropping the bits of dry orange into the barrel

Label in place, let’s see how it tastes in a week!

I knew that this barrel aged version had to be different from the kind I can whip up behind the bar.  The buffalo trace would be fine in a barrel, after all it had already been in one for 9 years!  The Angostura bitters would be fine in the barrel as well, at 47.5% abv, there is little that could go wrong mixed with other ingredients in an air-tight barrel.  As for the other crucial items, I knew I could not use sugar, fresh oranges or cherries, for they would either rot or ferment, and I did not want that kind of mess on my hands.  So I opted to use the Luxardo Maraschino liqueur to replace both the sugar and cherry aspects of the original cocktail.  For the orange flavor, I decided to use some dried orange peels left over from my infused bourbon creation.

I’m definitely looking forward to seeing what comes out when I remove the contents in a week or two.  Hopefully, I will end up with a rich complex version of a classic cocktail.

In the large 5 liter barrel I decided to try my hand at an aged manhattan.  Using a 2:1 ratio of Whiskey to Vermouth, I knew I should use 3 liters of whiskey to 1.5 liters of vermouth.  This left 500ml of space for a crucial but oft forgotten ingredient to the Manhattan, Angostura bitters.

Here is what I added to the large barrel, including the quantities:

3 liters Maker’s Mark bourbon

3 liters of some fine Maker's Mark bourbon

It puts the Maker’s Mark in the basket! Errrrr, I mean, barrel!

1.5 liters of Carpano Antica

500 ml of Carpano Antica measured out, ready to be added.

Pouring a whole 1-liter bottle of Carpano Antica into the barrel

Last, but not least, 500ml of sweet, sweet Angostura bitters!

Measuring out the Angostura bitters

500ml of Angostura bitters, thats a lot of love from Trinidad & Tobago!

The big barrel all ready to be rested for two weeks!

Obviously, I’ll have to report back on how these turn out.

Until then, happy cocktailing!

-W

A “New Fashioned” Cocktail

I’ve been extremely lucky in my past few restaurant/bar positions in that I have had some liberty in experimenting with different ingredients and techniques.  As I stated before, after my initial encounter with the Old Fashioned, I then began tinkering with different elements.  My best creation to date is appropriately named “The New Fashioned”.

With my current position at Hotel Casa 425 as the bar manager, I am very fortunate to be able to continue my experimentations and bring new things to the area.  I am in the final stages of finishing our new menu as well as a “secret cocktail menu” for those who are looking for something different.  I am doing my best to bring some diverse concepts, flavors and ingredients to the Inland Empire.  I hope that my program is well-received, my goal is to help spread the cocktail culture and educate guests on what is beyond their comfort zones.

One of the items on the secret menu will be my New Fashioned.  The New Fashioned base consists of a muddled strawberry with agave nectar and angostura bitters.  For the whiskey, I used Booker’s bourbon, a delicious high-proof spirit with lots of character.  I like this drink because the strawberry adds a more subtle sweetness than that of an “atomic red” maraschino cherry found in most bars.  The strawberry also adds a bit of acidity to the drink which I think helps bring out the vanilla and caramel notes of the bourbon.

You need:

2 ounces Booker’s bourbon

1 ounce agave nectar

1/2 strawberry diced

4-5 dashes Angostura bitters

2 ounces club soda

1 Old Fashioned glass

Ice (actual cubes are best, the bigger, the better)

1 orange

Citrus peeler or knife

Muddler

Method:

Add the agave and the bitters to the glass.  Since the agave is already in a syrup state, there is no need at this moment to incorporate the two.

New Fashioned base ingredients

Slice and dice half of a strawberry. Note: When I first experimented with this formula, I tried muddling both a whole strawberry and then a half strawberry.  I found that the drink tasted fine, but that the consistency was not ideal due to the way the strawberry stayed connected in a long strand.  My solution was to chop up the fruit so that it could inter-mingle with the rest of the drink and create a uniform substance.

Half a strawberry diced

Add the strawberry to the glass and muddle to release the juices and oils of the strawberry.  You don’t want to mash down hard, as the firmness of the strawberry may shoot the agave/bitters up and out of the glass. just use gentle pressure to break up the strawberry pieces into a pulp.

Half a strawberry in the glass

Muddling the strawberry, agave and bitters

The muddled mix

Once you have mashed the elements into a pureé-like consistency, it is time to add the Booker’s.  I like to use a jigger to ensure I pour the precise amount.  If you add too much or too little, the drink will not be balanced and the result will not be ideal.  We’ve all had a bartender who tried to “hook us up” with a heavy pour, but this rarely makes the drink any better.  In many cases it makes it worse, because then the cocktail is not palatable or even pleasant for that matter.  I digress…

Booker's and jigger

Once the Booker’s has been added, give the drink a gentle stir to mix in all the ingredients.  Use a bar spoon or straw to work the strawberries in with the bourbon.  This shouldn’t take more than a few seconds.  You want to try and create as uniform consistency as possible.

Stirring the New Fashioned

Add a large ice cube/cubes and stir again to create a little dilution.  Note: For the hotel bar, we have smallish ice cubes that work really well to dilute cocktails, but are not the best for chilling a drink.  I tried using our mini-muffin pans to make ice cubes, but as they have a specific use for baking, I had to discontinue its ice-making duties.  I am now working on getting some ice cube molds so that I can create the proper balance between dilution and chill, but until then, I work with what I’ve got.

Ice in the New Fashioned

Once the ice is in the glass, add the 2 ounces of club soda on top and give it another stir.  You don’t necessarily have to be precise with the 2 ounces, just fill the rest of the glass with the bubbly water.  Any brand of club soda will do, when I make these at home, I like using the small bottles of Schweppes or Canada Dry.

Adding club soda to the New Fashioned

Now it’s time for the orange.  Grab that citrus orb of goodness and with a knife or peeler, scalp that sucker to get some of the rind.  Don’t dig too deep, all you want is the surface and the pith (the white part).

Slicing an orange peel

A perfect orange peel

Now take the peel and squeeze the oils out over the top of the glass, and then wipe it along the rim of the glass to create a nice aromatic layer.  Remember, a great cocktail should be something that activates many senses.  In this case, the orange oils will create a wonderful smell as someone approaches the glass.

Squeezing the orange peel

Wiping the peel on the rim

We’re almost done.  Next you want to drop the orange peel into the glass.  The drink will actually develop more and change over time as the peel secretes more oils into the cocktail.  For some extra flair, take another strawberry and slice it halfway down the middle from the tip and place it on the edge of the glass.  I don’t always find it necessary, but the ladies who enjoy cocktails sure do love those fruits.

A finished New Fashioned

Give the drink another small swirl to get the orange peel mixing with his new friends and say, “Cheers!”  You just created a New Old Fashioned.

As I have said before, take your time enjoying this drink.  Take in the smell of the fresh orange with the sweet tartness of the strawberry.  Savor the spiciness of the Booker’s on your tongue while it mellows out from the sweetness of the agave and fruit.  Let it sit for a few minutes, and then give it another stir to move the orange peel around and further its complexity.

You will find a different sort of sweetness with this cocktail than you will with other traditional cocktails.  You will hopefully find a nice balance between the sweetness of the agave and strawberry with the bitterness of the Angostura and the orange.  The Booker’s bourbon will have that nice heat flavor from the high alcohol proof.  Altogether, I think this is a fantastic well-balanced cocktail that can be enjoyed at home or away at a bar that has the proper ingredients. (And an apt barman who has extra time and doesn’t mind thinking outside the box).

Cheers!

An Old Fashioned Cocktail

I was first introduced to the Old Fashioned cocktail in my early twenties, and to be honest, it was not love at first sight. I have been enjoying bourbon whiskey almost since I have been of legal drinking age, but the Old Fashioned just did not seem appealing. I think it had to do with the fact that it sounded so…….OLD! I suppose I always thought of it as an “old-man-drink” and never really bothered to give it a decent chance.

That all changed about three years ago. I was working as a server at Red White+Bluezz and our GM/Sommelier Russ Meek exclaimed “You’ve never had an Old Fashioned?!??!!”. I had to sheepishly admit that I had never had a good experience with one. He then proceeded to whip one up for me, detailing what he was using and his methods. His recipe was the “popular” one of today; sugar and bitters (YES!), cherry, orange, bourbon, ice, soda water.

My god, was it delicious!

It was a perfect blend of flavors and beautifully balanced. That evening I enjoyed two more creations, the last one being made by myself. That one experience had catapulted my love for the Old Fashioned cocktail into one of near fanaticism. For the next few months I constantly ordered them, suggested them, made them, drank them.

It was a glorious period of time.

I knew I had entered into a era of enjoying cocktails. By that, I mean, not just using booze to “escape”, but the whole experience of drinking and what it did to all of my senses. The sight of the orange slice and the brown bourbon interlaced with the bright red cherry. The initial smell of the aromatics of the angostura bitters and the oils of the citrus. The cool touch and feel of the condensed water on the side of the glass. The sound the ice made clinking around as I swirled the spirit against the soda and orange. And of course the terrific taste of balanced beauty as I gingerly sipped from the rim.

Over the years, I had also tried many variations, rye whiskey, irish whiskey, canadian whiskey, brandy, rum, and tequila. I tried different garnishes as well, lemon instead of orange, luxardo cherries instead of maraschino, strawberries instead of cherries. The possibilities seemed to be endless. I have also enjoyed creating my own variations of this wonderful concoction. I am even putting a “New Fashioned” on my secret cocktail menu at Hotel Casa 425 in Claremont, CA.

This past week I went on a little field trip to explore some nearby cocktail culture. I’ll get into the whole trip some other time, but I wanted to bring up my last stop which was at Las Perlas in DTLA. Las Perlas is a well-known tequila and mezcal bar, so when I saw they had an old fashioned cocktail, needless to say I was quite intrigued. After I ordered, I watched (as well as other curious onlookers) as the bar man lovingly created a fantastic perfectly-balanced well-structured cocktail. It was so good I ordered two more throughout the night and suggested it to a good friend (he loved it too).  The flavor of the reposado tequila combined with the smokiness of the mezcal made for such a pleasurable gift for my palate.  The complexity of the mexican spirits mixed with the sugar, bitters and citrus was so enjoyable, I knew that I had to try my hand at replicating this libation.  The next day at work, affectionately dubbed “the lab”, I successfully(!) re-created what I saw the bar man do.

To make this cocktail, you only need a handful of ingredients that again can be found at any BevMo or quality liquor store.  You might have a little trouble finding good mezcal, and please note that it should NOT have a worm at the bottom.  That is/was a marketing ploy and does not make the spirit any better.  With many things in life, you get what you pay for. So if you want a finely crafted quality cocktail, you may have to pay a little extra for proper ingredients.

You need:

1.5 ounces reposado or añejo tequila (I used Partida reposado)

.5 ounces mezcal (I used Del Maguey, San Luis del Rio village)

1 sugar cube

4-5 dashes aromatic cocktail bitters (I used the most well-known brand, Angostura)

1 Old Fashioned glass

Ice (actual cubes are best, the bigger, the better)

1 orange

1 maraschino cherry (If you can find/afford luxardo cherries, you will never want to use the atomic red kind)

Citrus peeler or knife

Muddler

Method:

Place the sugar in the glass and add 5 dashes of angostura bitters to that sweet little sucker.
Muddle/mash for about 10 seconds to create a syrup-like consistency.
Add the tequila and the mezcal and stir gently.
Add a large ice cube/cubes and stir again to create a little dilution.
Peel a slice of orange and squeeze over the glass to release the oils and then wipe the rind along the rim.
Add the luxardo cherry and say “Cheers!”, you just created a delicious smoky tequila Old Fashioned.

Just as you should with any aromatic cocktail, take your time enjoying it.  Appreciate the aromas of citrus and smoke.  Let the cherry add its sweetness to the drink for a few minutes before biting into it.  Try it with a peel of lemon or grapefruit instead of the orange for a variation.

Cheers!